Paradise Works Co-director Lucy Harvey announced as recipient of visual arts Clore Fellowship, supported by a-n

Artist and co-director of Paradise Works announced as part of cohort to receive bespoke professional development opportunity that seeks to develop leaders from across a wide range of cultural disciplines and sectors.

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The recipient of the Clore Fellowship, Visual Arts Fellowship, supported by a-n The Artists Information Company, has been announced as visual artist and Paradise Works co-director Lucy Harvey.

The fellowship is a bespoke professional development opportunity that seeks to develop leaders from across a wide range of cultural disciplines and sectors. Harvey is part of 25 new Fellows who will embark on the Clore Fellowship this autumn.

Known for creating sculpture, installation and public works that explore the ‘function of collection and heritage’, Harvey is also co-director of Salford-based organisation Paradise Works. Last year, she was selected for the Castlefield Gallery and a-n Artists’ International Delegation to Budapest and also programmed a-n’s Assembly Salford.

In 2016 Harvey also coordinated and curated the Place + Production programme for Rogue Artists’ Studios which marked the group’s final year at Crusader Mill.

Commenting on the impact the fellowship will have, Lucy said: “Being awarded the Clore Fellowship is a hugely exciting opportunity to research and develop my understanding of sustainable cultural practice and step beyond the artist-led. The Fellowship will allow me to explore how we can more effectively embed artist-led spaces into our changing urban landscapes and identify what civic roles artist communities might embrace to better ensure that our value is understood beyond the sector.

“I am so excited to start! It is a real honour to have my work over the last 2 years at Paradise Works recognised, but the Fellowship is also really timely, giving me an incredible opportunity to take stock, develop my skill-set and establish how to future-proof our organisation, share this impact, and figure out how my creative practice fits into this.”

The other 24 fellows work across 11 different cultural disciplines, from solo workers to those in 200+ people organisations, and are based in six regions across the UK and eight countries around the world. It includes a range of artists, managers, producers, directors, entrepreneurs and policy makers.

The full list includes: Alia Alzougbi, Sona Datta, Esther Richardson, Naomi Alexander, Janine Downes, Ihitashri Shandilya, Lucy Bayliss, Lucy Harvey, Róisín Stack, Stephen Bennett, Andrew Marcus, Melissa Strauss, Sarah Bird, Kez Margrie, Putul Verma, Emily Brennan, Botumelo Motsoatsoe, Matt Wilde, Sade Brown, Lina Mowafy, Ling Zhongjiang, Eduardo Carvalho, Omeima Mudawi-Rowlings, Joycelyn Choi Oi Yee, and Refilwe Nkomo.

In addition to a-n, the other funding partners for the Clore Leadership Programme in 2019/20 are: the Clore Duffield Foundation which initiated the programme in 2004; Arts Council England, which funds the Fellowship and a range of other Clore Leadership programmes; Arts Council Ireland; Art Fund; the Arts and Humanities Research Council; BBC; Chevening Secretariat through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office; Gatsby Charitable Trust; Home Affairs Bureau of the Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region through the Hong Kong Arts Development Council; National Lottery Heritage Fund; National Trust; The Linbury Trust and Wellcome Trust.

Darren Henley OBE, chief executive of Arts Council England, said: “This exciting group of Clore Fellows are an impressive bunch. They’ll be the creative leaders of tomorrow, making decisions that influence the development of cultural organisations for decades to come.”

Moira Sinclair, chair of Clore Leadership, added: “Our arts and cultural sector is only able to flourish with dynamic, diverse and curious leaders; those that are ambitious, innovative and able to inspire workforces and audiences alike. I hope they grab this opportunity now and for the cultural leaders they will become.”

For more information on the 2019/20 Clore Fellowship visit: www.cloreleadership.org

Buffer Zones, a group exhibition of thirteen critically acclaimed contemporary artists at Paradise Works Salford

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Buffer Zones

Preview: Thursday 11 July 2019, 6:00-8:30pm, with donations bar and wood-fired pizza.
Exhibition open: 12 July – 3 August 2019, 12-5pm or by appointment.

Paradise Works is delighted to present BUFFER ZONES, a group exhibition of thirteen critically acclaimed contemporary artists, curated by Nat Pitt (Division of Labour, The Manchester Contemporary).

Exhibiting Artists: Sally Payen, Larry Achiampong & David Blandy, Edward Clydesdale Thomson, Yelena Popova, Hilary Jack, Gavin Wade, Jeremy Hutchison, Simon & Tom Bloor, James Bridle, Marco Godoy, Ella Littwitz.

Buffer Zones brings together the works of thirteen artists in a physical commentary on the geo-political, social economic and cultural impacts of borders. The audience is invited to make a precarious journey though barricades, borders and partitions to experience Buffer Zones at Paradise Works. Conceived during the United Kingdom’s attempts to leave the EU, themes of division, separation of community and physical space take the fore in this immersive exhibition.

 “Space is not a scientific object removed from ideology or politics. It has always been political and strategic. There is an ideology of space. Because space, which seems homogeneous, which appears as a whole in its objectivity, in its pure form, such as we determine it, is a social product.”
― Henri Lefebvre

EXHIBITING ARTISTS

Larry Achiampong & David Blandy present Finding Fanon II from the series inspired by the lost plays of Frantz Fanon, (1925-1961) a politically radical humanist whose practice dealt with the psychopathology of colonisation and the socio-cultural consequences of decolonisation. Achiampong is based in London and has an MA in Sculpture from The Slade School of Fine Art. He is represented by Copperfield, David Blandy has an MA in Fine Art Media from the Slade School of Art and is represented by Seventeen.

Simon & Tom Bloor are artist brothers working collaboratively and based in Birmingham. For Buffer Zones they present spray-painted fences and barricades that question play, urban change and neglected space in the built environment.

James Bridle is an artist, writer, technologist and publisher working across technologies and disciplines. His artworks have been commissioned by galleries and institutions and exhibited worldwide and on the internet. His film, Flag For No Nations, first shown as a temporary installation at Ellinikón, Greece 2016 retells the history of an ill-fated satellite mission interwoven with narratives of borders, migration and another future.

Marco Godoy was born Madrid and studied Fine Arts at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid and the School of the Art, Institute of Chicago. He holds an MA in Photography from the Royal College of Art. Godoy explores the relationship between images and ideology.  He searches for alternative ways in which to talk about current social and political issues through the use of video, sculpture and performance. Recent work has focused on how authority is visually constructed by those who exercise power, and the tools that we have to confront it. For Buffer Zones he presents The Distance Between Us, a film exploring the systems used to maintain value and authority in relation to migration.

Jeremy Hutchison works across performance, sculpture, text and video, he constructs situations that insert disobedience and confusion into hegemonic structures. Hutchison’s Movables Project begins with a photo showing the inside of a Mercedes car, taken by police at the Balkan border. The headrests have been torn open to reveal a person hiding inside each seat attempting to disguise themselves as inanimate objects Combining elements of marketing and high-end fashion, the work enacts an anthropomorphic fusion between the male form and the consumer product.

Hilary Jack has an MA Fine Art from Manchester School of Art and holds a TIPP Postgraduate award from Goldsmiths and the Hungarian Academy. Hilary Jacks work has an activist element and focuses on the politics of place. Her neon art work No Borders currently at Yorkshire Sculpture Park inspired this show. The quotation is borrowed from the aviator, and feminist icon Amelia Earhart whose words can be viewed through a contemporary political lens referencing issues posed by BREXIT and continuing border conflicts across the globe. For Buffer Zones Hilary Jack creates Little Britain, an intervention into the gallery exploring suburban boundaries and the divisions revealed across the UK by the EU referendum.

Ella Littwitz studied in HISK, Ghent, Belgium (2016) and received her BFA from Bezalel, Jerusalem, Israel, in 2009. Her works have been exhibited in Israel, Europe and the US. For Buffer Zones Ella presents Natural Borders, utilising a piece of eucalyptus bark found in the shape of Israel borders without the occupied territories of both Gaza and the West Bank. The Eucalyptus tree is regarded as a symbol for the failure of the JNF (Jewish National Fund) project: In the 1950’s eucalyptus trees were brought to Israel to dry a specific area of swamps, at a cost of 25 million dollars. The project unintentionally revealed peat soil, causing wildfires over the region and a significant ecological crisis.

Dr Sally Payen has an MA in Painting from The Royal College of Arts, and a practice based PhD from Universty of Brighton. Payen shows a painting The Fence and The Shadow from her series based on her exploration and research about the contested landscape of Greenham Common and the women’s peace camps and anti-nuclear protests that took place in the 1980s.

Yelena Popova studied in USSR, and is based in Nottingham, UK She has an MA in Painting, The Royal College of Art. Popova’s practice encompasses painting, video and installation. Her work is tied together by an interest in exploring the concept of balance, whether in politics, representation, or in our relationship with machines. For Buffer Zones Popover exhibits This Certifies That, a tapestry designed to mark the exit of UK from the EU.

Edward Clydesdale Thomson’s is a Scottish/Danish artist based in the Netherlands. He is a graduate of the MFA program at the Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam and the BArch program at the Glasgow school of Art. His practice addresses contemporary conflicts of time by rethinking and reshaping the space and conditions of his artistic production along durational lines. His work is often concerned with places and objects on the margins – physically, socially or symbolically – of outside and inside, of wild and tamed landscapes, of decoration or function.

Gavin Wade is an award-winning artist, producer and curator, and director of Eastside Projects. For Buffer Zones, Wade exhibits Europa and The Bull (After Trewin Copplestone) a billboard from 2014 as David Cameron announced the referendum after being elected in 2015. Europa and the Bull features the Birmingham ‘Bullring’ Bull a public sculpture by Trewin Copplestone surrounded by the united stars of Europe.

Address: Paradise Works, East Philip Street, M3 7LE, Manchester

Access: Paradise Works is accessible by 2 flights of stairs.

Contact & viewings by appointment: info@paradise-works.com

Further information: www.paradise-works.com

Press release dated: 20 June 2019

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Jeremy Hutchison - Movables, 2017, Fondazione Prada Athens.jpg

Paradise Works Studio Manager

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Project Role: Studio Manager

*This role has been filled, please join our mailing list to hear about opportunities to work with us.*

Term: May – October 2019 (6 months)

Commitment: 1 day per week, 6 months @ Living Wage (£9 per hour with potential to increase to 2 days funding pending)

 ABOUT

Established in 2017, Paradise Works is a community of 36 artists working on the borders of Salford & Manchester. We believe that artists are an important asset in to urban development, and that the process of art-making connects the people who live, work and visit our city.

This why we aim to create a model of studio provision in Manchester that supports a unique artist community, champions the importance of artists in the city, and enables individual artists to develop the professional connections essential to a sustainable artistic career in the city they choose to call home.

In addition to supporting studio artists in developing their practice, we’ve established a dynamic public programme of Open Studios, Artist Residencies, exhibitions, screenings, off-site activities, studio visits and networking events. We have great partnerships & projects with Urban Splash, University of Salford, Manchester School of Art & Manchester International Festival.

2019 is an exciting year for Paradise Works. With support from Arts Council England, we’re able to take some time to explore how we make our organisation more sustainable by visiting other studios, working with consultants to review our business & income model, and pilot a brand-new Affiliates membership programme to grow our artist network.

The Studio Manager will develop and lead the administration and co-ordination of Paradise Works facilities. We are looking for a dynamic individual who can get involved in future-proofing one of the most exciting artist studio collectives in Manchester today. So, if you’re passionate about artist-led activity, with a strong sense of initiative and the capacity to support us with essential administration and coordination - then we’d love to hear from you. We want our organisation to represent the rich diversity of our city and would like to hear from people of all backgrounds, including BAME and/or people with disabilities.

For full details on this role and how to apply, download the project role description here.

Division of Labour joins Paradise Works

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Division of Labour (Worcester, London) relocate to Paradise Works as part of a 20 month research project into co-operatives and mutualism. Launching with their inaugural exhibition Apparel, this off-site project responds to questions posed by the artist Stuart Whipps challenging the gallery's modus operandi: Could a not-for-profit gallery for represented artists work as a collectivised mutual or co-operative group? What mechanisms and structures could be employed to create a working gallery where a fair distribution of profit from sales can exist?

Between 2018-19 Division of Labour will enact six exhibitions looking at clothes, food, healthcare, housing, transport and banking. Division of Labour founder Nathaniel Pitt will invite co-operatives and similar organisations to talk about and share their experiences as part of this programme. Nathaniel is curator to The Manchester Contemporary and founder of Pitt Projects.

Find out more about Apparel here.

Paradise Works on Radio 4: The Great Exhibition of the North

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Co-directors Hilary Jack and Lucy Harvey speak about their journey with Paradise Works and the landscape facing artists working in cities on BBC Radio 4 as part of The Great Exhibition of the North series.

The programme features Lubaina Himid, Ryan Gander and Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen alongside friends of Paradise, Scaffold Gallery and Division of Labour founder Nathaniel Pitt speaking during A-N Assembly Salford. Listen online

 

Reality: Tap to See More

REALITY: TAP TO SEE MORE   6.00pm – 9.00pm -   Thursday 19 April 2018 (one night only)    Presenting eclectic works in painting, sculpture, film and sound,  Reality: Tap To See More  showcases the vision and vitality of emerging artists from BA (Hons) Visual Arts at The University of Salford. The exhibition features new work by twelve second year students that demonstrate their individual responses to the relationship between the digital and the physical worlds.   Across a variety of media,  Reality: Tap To See More  acknowledges the key role that digital experiences and actions now play in our everyday lives. The artists consider how the physical reality of life is mediated by the digital; creating a showcase of uneasy ideas.   Liam Stevenson  is inspired by the Vaporwave music and art movement, and debuts a sound piece influenced by this niche genre, alongside collage and sculpture.    Rebekah Beasley  is interested in memories and the passing of time, and showcases an appropriated, analogue photography work cataloguing the past life of a stranger.    David Warrington  presents a compelling installation of painting, sound and live performance. David’s interests lie in the spiritual and material world and how exactly that can be defined, taking inspiration from the renowned Belgian artist René Magritte.    Amy Brown  focuses on the behavioural prompts of social media, and questions our online identities. Through painting, Brown asks how our online profiles intentionally and unintentionally limit our ‘real’ lives.    Mollie Balshaw’s  sculptural series directly explore the dwindling need for physical objects in our current social climate. Inspired by Arman’s sculpture series of ‘Accumulations’, her work delves into the loss associated with redundant technology.  Balshaw, who is one of the curators of the exhibition, said: “We’d really like visitors to ask how physical objects are becoming redundant? Or, if constantly looking at our phones will affect our memories in the long run? These are the type of ideas we’ve been thinking about in the lead up to  Reality: Tap To See More .”

REALITY: TAP TO SEE MORE
6.00pm – 9.00pm - Thursday 19 April 2018 (one night only) 

Presenting eclectic works in painting, sculpture, film and sound, Reality: Tap To See More showcases the vision and vitality of emerging artists from BA (Hons) Visual Arts at The University of Salford. The exhibition features new work by twelve second year students that demonstrate their individual responses to the relationship between the digital and the physical worlds. 

Across a variety of media, Reality: Tap To See More acknowledges the key role that digital experiences and actions now play in our everyday lives. The artists consider how the physical reality of life is mediated by the digital; creating a showcase of uneasy ideas.

Liam Stevenson is inspired by the Vaporwave music and art movement, and debuts a sound piece influenced by this niche genre, alongside collage and sculpture. 

Rebekah Beasley is interested in memories and the passing of time, and showcases an appropriated, analogue photography work cataloguing the past life of a stranger. 

David Warrington presents a compelling installation of painting, sound and live performance. David’s interests lie in the spiritual and material world and how exactly that can be defined, taking inspiration from the renowned Belgian artist René Magritte. 

Amy Brown focuses on the behavioural prompts of social media, and questions our online identities. Through painting, Brown asks how our online profiles intentionally and unintentionally limit our ‘real’ lives. 

Mollie Balshaw’s sculptural series directly explore the dwindling need for physical objects in our current social climate. Inspired by Arman’s sculpture series of ‘Accumulations’, her work delves into the loss associated with redundant technology.

Balshaw, who is one of the curators of the exhibition, said: “We’d really like visitors to ask how physical objects are becoming redundant? Or, if constantly looking at our phones will affect our memories in the long run? These are the type of ideas we’ve been thinking about in the lead up to Reality: Tap To See More.”

The Penthouse

We welcome The Penthouse!

www.thepenthousenq.com

The Penthouse, An artist led Dyke|Queer contemporary art project and space based in Manchester founded and ran by artists Rosanne Robertson and Debbie Sharp.

Our curatorial and research projects are focused on Queer art, radical practices, Queer feminism, experimental and raw art- we consider the power at the margins. The Penthouse is named after its first home on top floor of a tower block and as a political statement subverting the idea of art as a luxury commodity within a capitalist patriarchal system in which people are marginalised based on gender, sexuality, race, class and ability. We consider an ‘Other’ power which tackles elitism and dominant structures by the very nature of exploring self, the personal and the human in an unflinching way.

The Penthouse is now based at Paradise Works in a luxurious corner suite- a fitting
home on the border of Salford and Manchester.


UPCOMING EVENT:

The Penthouse are part of International Queer Art Collective Balaclava Q presenting upcoming event HIVideo on World Aids Day 1 Dec.

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The Penthouse Present HIVideo by Balaclava.Q
1 December 2017 at 19:00–22:30
Paradise Works, Salford

Donation entry: £2 to George House Trust.
(entry to both HIVideo & Visual Aids screenings).
Tickets free from Eventbrite for double screening (booking essential).

*Please note this event is adult only.

Dress warmly
Access via stairs only

This event is included in Manchester’s first Day With(out) Art programme from Superbia.


Further Information:

HIVideo is A Global Exhibition of Video Art for World Aids Day. HIVideo is the moving image strand of Balaclava.Q- an international Queer Art Project and collective, better known as TACTIC 2. HIVideo seeks to promote contemporary dialogue(s) on World Aids Day via video art from both a local and global perspective. HIVideo complements current discourse and the de- stigmatization / -criminalization movement by creating dialogue about HIV/AIDS via art – and the attendant aesthetics and politics.

In 2016 HIVideo was screened at Manchester’s LGBT Foundation and worldwide across Toronto (Canada), Paris (France), South Africa, Puerto Rico, New Mexico and Oakland (California, US) in galleries, safe spaces and sexual health centres. In 2017 The Penthouse present HIVideo at their home Paradise Works on the Manchester > Salford border.

HIVideo brings together international artists and venues across 5 continents to showcase art films which look at HIV/AIDS with the intention of a more direct action approach with a specific theme for artists. Films will be screened on World AIDS Day in Rome, (Italy), Manchester (UK), London (UK), Berlin (Germany), New Zealand, Puerto Rico, Colombia and various other locations across the UK, USA and Europe.

The artist films create awareness and promote discourse specifically about the Prevention Access Campaign, a global movement which seeks to educate communities on current findings and statistics which state unequivocally that Undetectable = Untransmissable or U=U as it has been branded by www.preventionaccess.org. At the very core of this year’s screening is a message about intimacy without fear of transmission.

This screening is programmed back to back with Visual Aids- a program of newly commissioned videos by Mykki Blanco, Cheryl Dunye & Ellen Spiro, Reina Gossett, Thomas Allen Harris, Kia Labeija, Tiona Nekkia McClodden and Brontez Purnell titled ALTERNATE ENDINGS, RADICAL BEGINNINGS is the 28th annual iteration of Visual AIDS’ longstanding Day With(out) Art project. Curated by Erin Christovale and Vivian Crockett. This event is part of Manchester’s first Day With(out) Art programme from Superbia.

Schools of Change

Taking place: Thursday 30th November 2017

Schools of Change is a night of performative film and video hosted by Paradise Works as an opener to the Artist Film Weekender at HOME

Each of the artists showing this evening playfully utilise and embody performance within their practice and embrace the potential for performance to instigate change.
Programmed by Chris Paul Daniels and Jenny Baines.

Featuring:

Jennet ThomasSchool of Change (2012), is a Sci-Fi musical film. We witness one day in the life of a school where students’ learning is bio-technically monitored through an ingested device, and high-scoring pupils perform their learning through a rhythmic action practice that produces little white spheres – called Units of Knowing – the currency through which this reality functions.

Laura HindmarshSelf-Registration (2015), an act of self-alignment using hand contact printing, and will also perform a new work deriving from Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale (1971).

Bea HautDefenestration (2015) combines film and domestic structures, reaching out beyond the frame, testing out access and escape, aperture and portal. Pending (2016) is a 16mm film performance using a 100ft length of film formed into a ‘living loop’ by the audience, before being taken up and played out by the projector. This interlacing creates a sympathetic film, which conjoins the audience, the artist and the subject in an act of duration and suspension.

Tariq EmamT.B.M. Reloaded (2017), is a live, site-responsive performance whereby tape noise will not be the only noise, and will feature R.L. Wilson and Guillaume Dujat: exploring recuperation of forlorn demons. The kind you find in charity shops, or wasting precious space in precious homes. The kind of space that could be used for a little bit of paradise. But what if it already was?

Thursday 30th November 2017
Entry price: £4.00 full / £3.00 conc, buy here:
https://homemcr.org/event/schools-of-change/
18:00 for a 18:30 start

Complimentary supper provided
Dress Warmly
Access via stairs only

THE MANCHESTER CONTEMPORARY

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Preview: Friday 27 October, 5:00 - 9:00pm

Saturday 28 October, 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sunday 29 October, 10:00am - 5:00pm

To coincide with the Launch Weekend, Paradise Works is pleased to showcase selected works from the groups inaugural exhibition, Politics of Paradise. Works by studio artists James Ackerley, William Hughes, Precious Innes, Hilary Jack, Kieran Leach, Jo McGonigal, Robin Megannity, Richard Shields, Cherry Tenneson and Claire Tindale explore the utopian ideals that underpin the groups identity and recent formation on the Salford and Manchester border. The Manchester Contemporary showcase serves as a taster of the group’s extended Politics of Paradise exhibition and open studios across the weekend of The Manchester Contemporary.

themanchestercontemporary.co.uk